Pioneer Cemetery
Home/Find Plot by Surname/Find Plot by Maiden Name/Find by Grave Site/Events/
History/Holy Family/Bursary/Restoration/Archives/Cookbook/Links

The 12 foot Obelisk tombstone in the foreground marks the final resting place of the Reverend Alexander Hunter, the first and founding minister of the "Auld Kirk" at Leith who died in 1871. It bears the inscription: "Mr. Hunter was a man greatly beloved, fervent in spirit, serving the Lord, and long to be remembered by his people, among whom he laboured with an affection that never wearied and that shone brightest at the close."

A view of the Leith Church showing the rear elevation. This aspect would not be out of place in rural Scotland and demonstrates the simple but elegant architecture of the building. The circular window, which once lit the bible on the raised pulpit, now contains a magnificent memorial stained glass window "The Holy Family" which was featured on the 1997 Canada Post Christmas stamp. The 'coffin' door (below right) leads directly from the chancel of the church to the heritage cemetery.

This is the large plaque placed in front of Leith Church by the Ontario Historic Sitesand Monuments Board to commemorate the life of Canada's greatest landscape painter Tom Thomson. Thomson grewto manhood on a farm just steps from here and he is buried in the Leith Church Heritage Cemetery. Directional signs on Ontario Highway 26 will lead the visitor and pilgrim to this site.

This simple granite stone marks the grave of Tom Thomson (1877-1917) in the Leith Cemetery. Thomson drowned under mysterious circumstances in Canoe Lake in Algonquin Park in the summer of 1917 and was thought by many to have been buried there. In fact the Thomson family insisted that his remains be returned here and buried beside the church he attended as a child and young man.

Leith Heritage Cemetery was established in 1864 on land donated to the church by Mr. Adam Ainslie a prominent local businessman and solicitor. The subsoil is sandy but admirably suited to the growth of evergreens and other ornamental trees. A walk around the cemetery shows the names of the many Scottishclans that settled in the area.